Boddington Meadow, Upper Boddington

Coronation Meadow

Boddington Meadow has never been ploughed and as a result retains much of its original wildlife. It is managed in a traditional way to encourage many less common species of plants, such as great burnet, pepper-saxifrage and pignut. In July, betony provides an impressive display of colour, while devil's-bit scabious exhibits its purple-blue flowers throughout the summer. The varied flora attracts a wide range of butterflies and insects. This meadow is still improving botanically and in full flower is a lovely sight, awash with colour.

Header image © Jane Pearman/Wildlife Trust BCN

Species to spot



  • Betony

    Best time to see: June - Sept.

    Long-living and slow-growing, this vivid magenta wild flower was used in the past as to protect against sorcery and - according to the Anglo Saxon Herbal - 'frightful nocturnal goblins'. Image © Plantlife/Andrew Gagg.

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  • Great burnet

    Best time to see: April - Aug.

    The bulbous, blood-red heads of this member of the rose family often indicate a floodplain meadow. The name burnet comes from the Old French for 'dark brown' - the same source as 'brunette'. 

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  • Devil’s-bit scabious

    Best time to see: June - Sept.

    A pink pin-cushion-like flower which our ancestors believed cured scabies (hence "scabious"). It has short, stubby roots which - according to legend - were bitten off by the Devil to prevent its healing powers.

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  • Common knapweed

    Best time to see: June - Sept

    A thistle-like plant also known as 'black knapweed', although its flowers are actually bright pink. It is a popular source of nectar for the Red Admiral, Meadow Brown, Peacock, Painted Lady and many other butterflies.

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  • Barn owl

    Best time to see: All year.

    Its silent flight and piercing screech have earnt it names like 'ghost owl' and 'death owl'. Able to hunt both night and day its heart-shaped face directs high-frequency sounds, helping it to find its prey. Image © Les Binns.

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