Wood Lane Road-verge Meadow, Long Stratton (Diss)

Coronation Meadow

The scale of destruction of flower-rich meadows and grasslands in Norfolk has been so severe that some of the best remaining fragments are now found on roadside verges. These tiny areas, vulnerable and valuable, can be alive with colourful flowers and insect life. They are so important that many are designated as Roadside Nature Reserves. Wood Lane is an excellent example of one of these.

A range of species typical of south Norfolk "boulder clay" grasslands can be found growing here, including dyer’s greenweed and the rare and beautiful sulphur clover - a wild flower now largely restricted to road verges in south Norfolk.

It is hoped that seed from these roadside verge meadows can be used to restore flower-rich meadows on nearby farmland once again.

Species to spot



  • Sulphur clover

    Best time to see: June - July

    Following a decline, this brimstone-yellow clover is now nationally scarce. It turns brown as its seeds ripen. Image © Bernd Haynold/CC BY-SA 3.0

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  • Bird’s-foot trefoil

    Best time to see: May-Sept.

    Also known as 'eggs and bacon', Bird's-foot trefoil is a good source of nectar for insects and forage for cattle. The 'bird's-foot' of its name refers to the shape of its seed pods.

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  • Dyer’s greenweed

    Best time to see: June - August

    A low-lying member of the pea family. As its name suggests, this flower has been used to make yellow dye since ancent times and combined with woad produces a superb green hue.

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  • Water vole

    Best time to see: All year

    The inspiration for 'Ratty' in Wind in the Willows, this vole is sadly our fastest declining mammal. It can be distinguished by its rounded nose and ears. 'Lawns' of nibbled grass can be found near their burrows. Image © Tom Marshall

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Vital statistics

Owned by

Norfolk County Council