Chadkirk Wildflower Meadow, Stockport

Coronation Meadow

 

Chadkirk is a jewel in Stockport’s crown. The two meadows within the estate are designated as a Site of Biological Importance and as such are rare in the borough. Since being enhanced in 2005 a wealth of new species have been identified, including great crested newts, six-spot burnet and common blue butterfly. The pond on site is one of only a number of ponds within Greater Manchester known to support all five species of amphibian present in the county. 

Header image © Sue Nottingham/Plantlife.

Species to spot



  • Cowslip

    Best time to see: April - May

    Easy to spot with its yellow cup-shaped flowers nodding at the end of tall stems. The name cowslip allegedly derives from ‘cowslup' - an old term for cowpat - since where the cow 'slupped' this flower was often found. 

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  • Bird’s-foot trefoil

    Best time to see: May-Sept.

    Also known as 'eggs and bacon', Bird's-foot trefoil is a good source of nectar for insects and forage for cattle. The 'bird's-foot' of its name refers to the shape of its seed pods.

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  • Six-spot burnet moth

    Best time to see: June - Aug

    Unlike many moths, the burnet moth flies during the day. Its caterpillars feed on Bird's-foot Trefoil whilst the adults feed on the nectar of knapweed, thistles and other grassland flowers. Image © Bob Coyle

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  • Oxeye daisy

    Best time to see: June - Aug.

    Large and daisy-like, the oxeye tends to bloom around midsummer and in fact is called the Sunnwendbleaml - or 'solstice flower' - in Austria. Before the 16th century it was known as the 'Moon Daisy' or 'Dog Daisy'.
     

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  • Common knapweed

    Best time to see: June - Sept

    A thistle-like plant also known as 'black knapweed', although its flowers are actually bright pink. It is a popular source of nectar for the Red Admiral, Meadow Brown, Peacock, Painted Lady and many other butterflies.

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Owned by

Stockport Metropolitan Borough Council