Chettisham Meadow, Chettisham

Coronation Meadow

An historic remnant of neutral grassland that has been managed as a traditional hay meadow for over a century. Ridge and furrow earthworks (remnants of ploughing from the Middle Ages) are still visible, and many different fine grasses are found, including sweet vernal-grass, red fescue, quaking-grass and yellow oat-grass. Cowslips with their apricot-scented yellow-orange flowers are abundant from March to May. A spectacular show of green-winged orchids appears in late April and May. Other plants include bee and common spotted-orchids, ox-eye daisy, adder's-tongue fern and pepper-saxifrage.

Header image © R G Woods

Recipient Meadows

How to get there

From Chettisham village (please note: there is limited roadside parking) walk left past Church, follow byway across busy A10. After 400m take left track at junction with a wooden finger post pointing the way. Chettisham Meadow is 200m on left. 

Species to spot



  • Cowslip

    Best time to see: April - May

    Easy to spot with its yellow cup-shaped flowers nodding at the end of tall stems. The name cowslip allegedly derives from ‘cowslup' - an old term for cowpat - since where the cow 'slupped' this flower was often found. 

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  • Green-winged orchid

    Best time to see: May

    The jester-like motley of its green and purple flowers gives this orchid its scientific name: morio, meaning 'fool'. It can sometimes be confused with the early-purple orchid but does not have spots on its leaves.

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  • Bee orchid

    Best time to see: June - July

    One of nature's mimics: this orchid looks like a bee visiting a flower, attracting other bees as they try to mate with it. Despite this clever strategy, in Britain the bee orchid is largely self-pollinating. Image © Plantlife/Tim Wilkins

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  • Oxeye daisy

    Best time to see: June - Aug.

    Large and daisy-like, the oxeye tends to bloom around midsummer and in fact is called the Sunnwendbleaml - or 'solstice flower' - in Austria. Before the 16th century it was known as the 'Moon Daisy' or 'Dog Daisy'.
     

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  • Barn owl

    Best time to see: All year.

    Its silent flight and piercing screech have earnt it names like 'ghost owl' and 'death owl'. Able to hunt both night and day its heart-shaped face directs high-frequency sounds, helping it to find its prey. Image © Les Binns.

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