Greaves’ Meadow

Coronation Meadow

 

Greaves' meadow lies in a remote corner of Fermanagh in the south west of Northern Ireland. It was traditionally cut for many years for hay until a few years ago when the site was abandoned, an issue that is unfortunately all too common in the Fermanagh area. However in the last decade traditional practices were resumed by sympathetic new owners and the site is once again flourishing. The meadow is awash with the yellows of birds foot trefoil, purple orchid spikes and the pinks of the ragged robin. The resumption of traditional practices is not just good news for the plants but also the animals that depend on these habitats, priority species such as skylark and Irish hare that use the cover to nest and lay up respectively. Apart from the local wildlife these meadows are also incredibly important to the local practices and customs such as the local mummers (seasonal folk plays) that depend on the hay for rope making and the wild flowers for making garlands.

Header image © Wildlife Trusts

Species to spot



  • Early purple orchid

    Best time to see: April - June

    Often arriving with the bluebell, this early orchid has a wonderful scent, not dissimilar to lily-of-the-valley and is the "long purple" of Ophelia's garland, referred to by Gertrude in Shakespeare's Hamlet. 

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  • Bird’s-foot trefoil

    Best time to see: May-Sept.

    Also known as 'eggs and bacon', Bird's-foot trefoil is a good source of nectar for insects and forage for cattle. The 'bird's-foot' of its name refers to the shape of its seed pods.

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  • Reed bunting

    Best time to see: All year

    During the breeding season, males can be spotted voicing their simple three-note territorial call. Females nest low in the dense vegetation. Image © Amy Lewis.

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  • Common spotted-orchid

    Best time to see: June - July

    Our most common orchid enlivens many places, particularly chalk and limestone downs. Its flowers can vary from deep to light pink and the leaves are marked with spots. 

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  • Ragged-robin

    Best time to see: May - June

    With its air of charming dishevellment, this rakish wildflower brightens up damp and poorly drained meadows. It blooms when the cuckoo starts to call. Image © Plantlife/Chris Harris.

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Owned by

Ian and Hazel Morris