Balchroich Meadow, Keltneyburn

Coronation Meadow


"A huge variety of wildflowers in summer."

- Alan Anderson, Scottish Wildlife Trust
 

A fantastic wildflower meadow containing, amongst other plants, eight different species of orchid, including small white, greater butterfly and fragrant, the latter scenting the air with its clove-like perfume to attract pollinators. The meadow is also home to moonwort, a strange little grassland fern and, spignel, an unusual member of the parsley family related to fennel. The leaves of spignel release an aniseed scent when crushed and farmers would try and remove it from meadows as the smell would pass through to the milk from grazing cattle.  

Many butterfly and dragonfly species can also be found here. Both cattle and sheep graze the reserve in early spring and late summer.

"Keltneyburn Meadow being crowned a Coronation Meadow is fantastic news. It will be very satisfying to use the seeds from the wonderful array of wild flowers we have here to help create new meadows and in so doing help make the PErthshire countryside a more colourful and diverse place for people to visit and enjoy"

- Rab Potter, The Scottish Wildlife Trust Reserve Manager for the North East

How to get there

Keltneyburn lies five miles west of Aberfeldy, beside a minor road off the B846. The meadow can be reached from the public road at Keltneyburn village, up a steep track next to General Stewart's statue. There is a rough waymarked trail within the meadow; please stay on this trail as this will prevent wild orchids being trampled. The gorge is steep and inaccessible.

Cars can be left in Keltneyburn at the bottom of the steep access track to the meadow. There is also a small car park at the top of the reserve track.

Species to spot



  • Fragrant orchid

    Best time to see: June - July

    Usually pink but can vary from purple to white. The fragrant orchid lives up to its name by producing a sweet, orangey smell that is particularly strong in the evening. Image © Philip Precey

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  • Greater butterfly orchid

    Best time to see: June - July

    Despite its name this dainty flower is largely pollinated by moths, attracted by a vanilla scent that grows stronger at night. The lesser butterfly orchid looks very alike - the main difference the size and position of its pollen sacs.

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  • Oxeye daisy

    Best time to see: June - Aug.

    Large and daisy-like, the oxeye tends to bloom around midsummer and in fact is called the Sunnwendbleaml - or 'solstice flower' - in Austria. Before the 16th century it was known as the 'Moon Daisy' or 'Dog Daisy'.
     

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  • Northern brown argus

    Best time to see: June - July

    A small brown butterfly with vivid orange spots. Those found in Scotland have a distinctive white spot found on the upper surface of the fore-wing. The caterpillars feed on rock-rose. Image © Velella/CC BY-SA

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  • Red deer

    Our largest deer. Males stags have large, branching antlers, which increase in size as they get older. Image © Gillian Day.

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    More information on The Wildlife Trusts’ website