Priory Meadows, Kingston upon Hull

Coronation Meadow

Priory Meadows sit on the edge of the City of Hull; its proximity to the city has allowed it to escape conversion to arable. The fields here support a range of flowering plants that are rare within the city of Hull and even the wider area of the East Riding of Yorkshire. In mid summer in flower, the site is full of colour and supports farmland birds singing from the mature hedgerows.

"I have known it for 25 years and visit weekly from spring to autumn to do a Butterfly Conservation transect. This year thousands of butterflies emerged nectaring on a variety of plants but notably Marsh Thistle and later, Devils-bit Scabious"

- Andrew Ashworth, local Botanist

Species to spot



  • Devil’s-bit scabious

    Best time to see: June - Sept.

    A pink pin-cushion-like flower which our ancestors believed cured scabies (hence "scabious"). It has short, stubby roots which - according to legend - were bitten off by the Devil to prevent its healing powers.

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  • Betony

    Best time to see: June - Sept.

    Long-living and slow-growing, this vivid magenta wild flower was used in the past as to protect against sorcery and - according to the Anglo Saxon Herbal - 'frightful nocturnal goblins'. Image © Plantlife/Andrew Gagg.

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  • Adder’s-tongue fern

    When to see: June - August

    Its bright green, serpentine spike is a distinctive sight and likely the "adder's tongue" in question. A good indicator of ancient meadows. Image © Andrew Gagg/Plantlife.

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  • Skylark

    Best time to see: All year

    Male skylarks can be spotted rising almost vertically from the ground, hovering and singing from a great height before parachuting back down to earth. Despite their aerial activities, skylarks nest on the ground, laying three to four eggs. Image (c) Stefan Johansson

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