Twenty Acres, Endrick Mouth

Coronation Meadow

Twenty Acres Meadow, part of Loch Lomond National Nature Reserve, hosts over 115 meadow and marshland plants including the UK population of Scottish dock and rare tufted loosestrife. It is a remnant of the once wide-ranging hay meadows that could be found in Dumbartonshire and a reminder of both the diversity and beauty that can be found at these sites. 

It was saved from becoming rough pasture in the 1980s, when grazing was halted and a more traditional hay meadow cutting regime was reintroduced. This allowed the more sensitive plants stored in the seed banks to prosper once more, as well as providing ideal conditions for breeding birds and invertebrates. The site is still recovering and continues to improve.

- Paula Baker, RSPB Loch Lomond. Header image above © RSPB

 

Please note, the meadow is only open to the public on specially arranged days – more details to follow

Species to spot



  • Northern Marsh Orchid

    Best time to see: May - July

    With its wine-purple flowers the northern marsh orchid can be distinguished from its southern relatives by its tiny 'diamond shaped' lip. Image © Steve Povey/geograph.co.uk

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  • Whorled caraway

    This frothy flower derives its name from its leaves which form a circlet - or 'whorl' - around the base of its stem. Although its related to the spice Caraway, it has no culinary or medicinal use. Image © Plantlife/Bob Gibbons

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  • Small pearl-bordered fritillary

    Best time to see: June - July

    Preferring damp meadows, this butterfly flies low to the ground frequently skipping from flower to flower to drink nectar. In recent years it has declined dramatically in England. Image © Hugh Venables/CC BY-SA

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  • Reed bunting

    Best time to see: All year

    During the breeding season, males can be spotted voicing their simple three-note territorial call. Females nest low in the dense vegetation. Image © Amy Lewis.

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Managed by

RSPB