Upwood Meadows, Upwood

Coronation Meadow

 

Ancient grazing meadows with wildflowers galore.

Designated a National Nature Reserve for its floral diversity, Upwood is awash with life. The greatest display is in Bentley meadow where medieval ridge and furrow and the many ant hills provide differing micro habitats for plants and invertebrates. Here plants including cowslip, green-winged orchid and dyer's greenweed provide summer long colour and nectar sources for bees and butterflies (see 'Species to spot' below). Dew ponds dug in each field originally for watering livestock, are now breeding grounds for Great Crested Newts, dragonflies and damselflies.

Recipient Meadows

Species to spot



  • Cowslip

    Best time to see: April - May

    Easy to spot with its yellow cup-shaped flowers nodding at the end of tall stems. The name cowslip allegedly derives from ‘cowslup' - an old term for cowpat - since where the cow 'slupped' this flower was often found. 

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  • Green-winged orchid

    Best time to see: May

    The jester-like motley of its green and purple flowers gives this orchid its scientific name: morio, meaning 'fool'. It can sometimes be confused with the early-purple orchid but does not have spots on its leaves.

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  • Dyer’s greenweed

    Best time to see: June - August

    A low-lying member of the pea family. As its name suggests, this flower has been used to make yellow dye since ancent times and combined with woad produces a superb green hue.

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  • Meadow buttercup

    Best time to see: May - Aug.

    A giant relative of the buttercups often on lawns. Its likely this flower put the 'butter' in buttercup given its tendency to grow in meadows grazed by dairy cows. © Ray Woods.

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