Yair Haugh, Clovenfords

Coronation Meadow

This wet pasture in the haugh land - the local name for flat ground by a river - of the River Tweed is generally damp, with much of it being Purple Moor-grass and Rush Pasture. Not only does Yair Haugh contain good habitat diversity, it is also home to over 60 recorded plant species including Common Rock-rose, Ragged Robin and Devil's-bit Scabious. Historically this 5ha site has a long use - there is a sheep-fold at its southern edge beside what appears to be the ruin of a very old, small building. In recent years, Yair Haugh has seen an improvement in its condition through management and conservation grazing.

Image - Forestry Commission Scotland, Jeff Waddell

Species to spot



  • Ragged-robin

    Best time to see: May - June

    With its air of charming dishevellment, this rakish wildflower brightens up damp and poorly drained meadows. It blooms when the cuckoo starts to call. Image © Plantlife/Chris Harris.

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  • Devil’s-bit scabious

    Best time to see: June - Sept.

    A pink pin-cushion-like flower which our ancestors believed cured scabies (hence "scabious"). It has short, stubby roots which - according to legend - were bitten off by the Devil to prevent its healing powers.

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  • Meadowsweet

    Best time to see: June - Sept.

    This frothy wild flower has a scent not unlike marzipan. Its sap contains the chemical responsible for aspirin and was in fact used as a medicine in Medieval times. Image © Plantlife/Andrew Gagg

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