Joan’s Hill Farm, Woolhope

Coronation Meadow


"Each year the floral display seems to be more and more spectacular."

- Joe Costley, Reserves Manager, Plantlife
 

A combination of factors make Joan’s Hill an outstanding site: its wonderful setting in the tranquil Wye Valley Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, its rich and colourful meadow flora, the way Haugh Wood (an ancient broadleaved woodland) encloses and integrates with the meadow and the nearby presence of lovely traditional English rural features, such as an old orchard and a “black and white” farmhouse.

Management of the nature reserve includes hay cutting in late summer - usually after the first two weeks of July - followed by cattle grazing in the autumn.

Recipient Meadows

How to get there

From Hereford, take the B4224 towards Fownhope. On reaching Mordiford (approximately 4 miles outside Hereford) take the left turn immediately after the The Moon Inn, signposted to Woolhope.

Follow this narrow, winding road for approximately 1½ miles before turning left into Haugh Wood car park and picnic site.

The reserve is ¾ mile walk from the car park and is reached by walking northwards along the woodland ride leading off from the north east corner of the car park. You will reach a 'cross-roads' in the woodland rides. Here you should go straight ahead and follow the track downhill to a T-Junction. Turn left at the T-junction. The gate to Joan's Hill Farm is a further 200m along this track.

The nearest train station is Hereford which is 6 miles from the reserve.

Species to spot



  • Dyer’s greenweed

    Best time to see: June - August

    A low-lying member of the pea family. As its name suggests, this flower has been used to make yellow dye since ancent times and combined with woad produces a superb green hue.

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  • Common spotted-orchid

    Best time to see: June - July

    Our most common orchid enlivens many places, particularly chalk and limestone downs. Its flowers can vary from deep to light pink and the leaves are marked with spots. 

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  • Green-winged orchid

    Best time to see: May

    The jester-like motley of its green and purple flowers gives this orchid its scientific name: morio, meaning 'fool'. It can sometimes be confused with the early-purple orchid but does not have spots on its leaves.

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  • Common knapweed

    Best time to see: June - Sept

    A thistle-like plant also known as 'black knapweed', although its flowers are actually bright pink. It is a popular source of nectar for the Red Admiral, Meadow Brown, Peacock, Painted Lady and many other butterflies.

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Managed by

Plantlife