Marden Meadow, Staplehurst

Coronation Meadow


One of the few remaining unimproved neutral meadows in Kent

This idyllic meadow serves to remind visitors of just how much of this classic English landscape has been lost. Consisting of three fields it boasts one of the best remaining examples of unimproved hay meadows in Kent. Green-winged orchids are abundant in May and later in the year many daisies, vetches and wild grasses are common. Two ponds feature here, the smaller of the two often having an abundant show of water violet. The larger pond has stands of bulrush and vegetation that provides a nesting habitat for reed warblers, ducks and geese.

"Each spring, Marden dons its coat of many colours and dazzles with orchids living in harmony with meadow grasses, herbs and ferns. The green-winged orchid, which has decreased by 50% in the UK over the last 50 years, still thrives here. If ever there was a place to evoke those childhood memories - this is it!"

- Peter Payne, Honorary Warden of Marden Meadow and Vice Chairman of Kent Wildlife Trust

 

Header image © C Moncrieff

Recipient Meadows

Species to spot



  • Adder’s-tongue fern

    When to see: June - August

    Its bright green, serpentine spike is a distinctive sight and likely the "adder's tongue" in question. A good indicator of ancient meadows. Image © Andrew Gagg/Plantlife.

    Did you spot this species...?
    Share your find on Twitter or Facebook


  • Green-winged orchid

    Best time to see: May

    The jester-like motley of its green and purple flowers gives this orchid its scientific name: morio, meaning 'fool'. It can sometimes be confused with the early-purple orchid but does not have spots on its leaves.

    Did you spot this species...?
    Share your find on Twitter or Facebook


  • Bird’s-foot trefoil

    Best time to see: May-Sept.

    Also known as 'eggs and bacon', Bird's-foot trefoil is a good source of nectar for insects and forage for cattle. The 'bird's-foot' of its name refers to the shape of its seed pods.

    Did you spot this species...?
    Share your find on Twitter or Facebook


  • Dyer’s greenweed

    Best time to see: June - August

    A low-lying member of the pea family. As its name suggests, this flower has been used to make yellow dye since ancent times and combined with woad produces a superb green hue.

    Did you spot this species...?
    Share your find on Twitter or Facebook


  • Meadow buttercup

    Best time to see: May - Aug.

    A giant relative of the buttercups often on lawns. Its likely this flower put the 'butter' in buttercup given its tendency to grow in meadows grazed by dairy cows. © Ray Woods.

    Did you spot this species...?
    Share your find on Twitter or Facebook

Managed by

Kent Wildlife Trust