Old Pulford Brook Meadows, Rossett

Coronation Meadow

Taking their name from Old Pulford Brook, a natural meandering brook that flows into the Dee, the meadows here are one of the best remaining examples of flood-meadow communities in Wales. These rare and threatened habitats have declined dramatically during the last century. Protected as a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) and managed by North Wales Wildlife Trust, the meadows are rich in plant life, home to a wide range of grass species and flowering plants that contain a riot of varying colours in summer.

The meadows also have a population of Mousetail, a small flower which is uncommon in North East Wales and which favours the bare, damp ground often found around gateways.

 

Header image above © North Wales Wildlife Trust

Species to spot



  • Great burnet

    Best time to see: April - Aug.

    The bulbous, blood-red heads of this member of the rose family often indicate a floodplain meadow. The name burnet comes from the Old French for 'dark brown' - the same source as 'brunette'. 

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  • Meadowsweet

    Best time to see: June - Sept.

    This frothy wild flower has a scent not unlike marzipan. Its sap contains the chemical responsible for aspirin and was in fact used as a medicine in Medieval times. Image © Plantlife/Andrew Gagg

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  • Yellow rattle

    Best time to see: May - Sept.

    A semi-parasitic flower, that feeds off nutrients in nearby grass roots. In doing so it helps restrict the vigorous grasses, allowing more delicate wildflowers to emerge. Its 'rattle' is from tiny seeds in their pods.

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  • Brown hare

    Best time to see: All year

    Often seen bounding across fields using their powerful hind legs to propel them forwards in a zigzag pattern. In early spring, Brown Hares are at their most visible as the breeding season encourages fighting or 'boxing'. Image © Damian Waters/drumimages.co.uk

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  • Water vole

    Best time to see: All year

    The inspiration for 'Ratty' in Wind in the Willows, this vole is sadly our fastest declining mammal. It can be distinguished by its rounded nose and ears. 'Lawns' of nibbled grass can be found near their burrows. Image © Tom Marshall

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