Red Hill, Goulceby

Coronation Meadow


"A snapshot of the past... it evokes
a sense of nostalgia."

- Paul Learoyd, Lincolnshire Wildlife Trust
 

One of the most attractive and interesting fragments of ancient 'sheep walk' downland which once covered much of the chalk wolds. Part of the site used to be a barley field. Now an extension to the SSSI, it is one of the best chalk down land meadows in Lincolnshire.

The top of the hill is the best place to spot wild flowers, especially those that favour chalk soils such as kidney vetch and bee orchids (see 'Species to spot' below). The nearby disused quarry is rich in fossils.

Header images (above) © Lincolnshire Wildlife Trust.

Cowslips at Red Hill...

Red Hill Wildflower Coronation Meadow from Lincolnshire Wildlife Trust on Vimeo.

Recipient Meadows

How to get there

The meadow adjoins the Goulceby-Raithby road, about 1.5 km (0.9 miles) south-west of the Bluestone Heath Road. Parking places are provided at the top end and to the east of the meadow.

Species to spot



  • Kidney vetch

    Best time to see: May - Sept.

    Also known as 'Lady's fingers' this lemon-hued wild flower is the sole food supply of the caterpillar of Britain's smallest butterfly: the small blue. Image © Plantlife/Cath Shelswell

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  • Six-spot burnet moth

    Best time to see: June - Aug

    Unlike many moths, the burnet moth flies during the day. Its caterpillars feed on Bird's-foot Trefoil whilst the adults feed on the nectar of knapweed, thistles and other grassland flowers. Image © Bob Coyle

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  • Bird’s-foot trefoil

    Best time to see: May-Sept.

    Also known as 'eggs and bacon', Bird's-foot trefoil is a good source of nectar for insects and forage for cattle. The 'bird's-foot' of its name refers to the shape of its seed pods.

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  • Common spotted-orchid

    Best time to see: June - July

    Our most common orchid enlivens many places, particularly chalk and limestone downs. Its flowers can vary from deep to light pink and the leaves are marked with spots. 

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  • Lincoln Red

    Derived from Shorthorn-type cattle native to Lincolnshire that were especially suited to draught work.  During the 1940s and 1950s a breeding programme resulted in the Lincoln Red becoming a hornless (polled) breed and today it is renowned as a superb beef animal

    Image by Ruth Dalton, RBST

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  • Pyramid Orchid

    Best time to see: June and July when it flowers

    A highly distinctive wildflower with a pyramid shaped head of bright pink flowers.Like many orchids, it requires a specific fungus to be present in the soil in order to bloom.

    Image by Plantlife

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